In the mood for Super Healthy Cottage Pie

New recipe: Low Fat Winter Comfort Food

It’s the fourth day of Winter and whilst I’m not crazy about the cold weather that arrived exactly 4 days ago, I am beside myself with the idea of warm cozy comfort food. Mmmmmmm, comfort food…… Yes, I am a comfort food lover of epic proportions. If I had to choose between a big bowl of stew and Heston’s Fillet of Aberdeen Angus, I would go the stew every single time. What can I say, I’m a peasant at heart.

So you can imagine how excited I am by a humble cottage pie. Oh my, love a cottage pie. I know that Cottage Pie is supposed to be beef and Shepherd’s Pie uses lamb, but what would you call a pie with a turkey filling? Gobbler’s Pie? Poulterer’s Pie? I’m just gonna stick with cottage pie.

What I love most about a cottage pie is that you can put just about anything you want in it – whatever you’ve got in the fridge. Mince of any flavour, leftover roast meat, whatever veges you have; so long as you top it with mashed potato. Mmmmmm, mashed potato……

 

Super Healthy Cottage Pie

 

So why is this pie so super healthy?
•    Lean turkey mince to keep the fat and kilojoules way down.
•    Sweet potato instead of potato for its extra fibre and low GI goodness.
•    Loads of vegetables for bulk and a boost of vitamins and minerals.
•    Skim milk and light margarine (or butter) in the mash for extra tasty lightness.

If you can’t find lean turkey mince, choose another extra light protein – pork would work well as would chicken. For a vegetarian option, replace the turkey with mushrooms, tofu or a can of lentils.

 

Are you a fan of Winter comfort food? What’s your favourite chow down comfort dish? And what would you call a turkey cottage pie if you had to come up with a new name?

 

Super Healthy Cottage Pie

Serves 4
Per serve: 1348kj (321cals); 3.9g total fat (1.1g saturated fat); 7g fibre

 

  • 600g peeled sweet potato
  • Oil spray
  • 500g lean turkey mince
  • 1 large onion (160g), finely sliced
  • 2 celery sticks (100g), finely sliced
  • 2 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 cup frozen peas (110g)
  • 1 tbsp tomato paste
  • 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tsp ground sage
  • 1 cup stock
  • ¼ cup skim milk, warmed
  • 2 tsp light margarine
  • 1 spring onion (15g), finely chopped

Spray four 1½ cup capacity ramekins or one 6 cup capacity oven dish with oil and set aside. Heat oven to 200°C and line a baking tray with baking paper.

Dice sweet potato into 2cm cubes and spray lightly with oil. Bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes until soft. While potato is baking, heat a large non-stick frying pan on medium-high, spray lightly with oil and add turkey mince, onion, celery and garlic with a pinch of salt. Cook until turkey is cooked and vegetables are softened (about 8 minutes). Add peas, tomato paste, Worcestershire Sauce, sage and stock. Stir through well and divide mixture among ramekins or place into oven dish.

Remove sweet potato from the oven and place into a bowl. Mash roughly, adding milk, margarine and spring onion to combine. Season with a little salt and pepper and place on top of the mince mixture. Spray lightly with oil and bake in the oven for 15 minutes until golden. Serve with a big salad or vegetables of your choice.

 

Cook’s Notes

  • If you can’t be bothered roasting the sweet potato or if you’re in a little more of a hurry, feel free to boil it and mash. The reason I roast it is to get a lovely roasty flavour.
  • Not all turkey mince is made equal. Make sure you grab a lean one made from turkey breast if you want to keep it extra light.
  • You can also use chicken or pork mince for this recipe – just make sure it’s lean mince.

 

Healthy eating!

jay

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